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Carpenter Bee and
Honey Bee Extraction

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Humane Bee Hive Removal

Bees are often confused with other stinging insects such as wasps or hornets, which can be aggressive when provoked. Most bees are not hostile and they are incredibly beneficial to the ecosystem. Honey bees are an integral aspect of our agricultural system due to their pollination of plants and honey they produce for human consumption. The bee society is strictly regimented into three groups per colony: a queen (the only fertile female), drones (males with no stingers), and the workers. There are hundreds of bee species in Colorado; before you unknowingly kill a yellow-and-black insect, it is imperative to determine which one you are dealing with. Creature Control can accurately and safely assess the pest issue you are facing and remediate accordingly. We work in conjunction with local beekeepers to relocate honey bee hives.

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Types of Bees

Bumble Bees
Bumble Bee

These large, slow, fuzzy yellow-and-black bees usually create hives underground. Bumble bees are known to pollinate flowers of all kinds, including fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes and blueberries. Buzz pollination is caused by the bee shaking its wings at such a high frequency that the pollen falls into the flower. Only female (worker) bumble bees can sting, and they can do so multiple times without dying.

Carpenter Bees
Carpenter Bee

Carpenter bees can be a nuisance as they burrow nests and lay eggs in untreated wood structures. Nests can be spotted by the appearance of a big, round, buzzing bee accompanied by numerous small, perfectly round holes in wood. Like bumble bees, carpenter bees are fuzzy, except the back of their abdomen is shiny, hairless, and black. The fuzz on males is yellow or orange; females are always black. Carpenter bees are not as social as other bees and are solitary, which means they will not swarm. The damage they cause is a direct result of their nesting habits. They burrow in eaves, window trim, facia boards, siding, wooden shakes, play structures, and decks. Their nests are structured in tunnel patterns within the wood; if left untreated, they can cause considerable damage. The best way to prevent carpenter bee infestations is to paint all exterior wood. If the bees have already made their way inside, treatment varies and can take several weeks.

Honey Bees
Honey Bee

Honey bees are some of the most fascinating and productive insects in nature. They pollinate roughly 80 percent of America's flowering crops, which make up about one-third of our diet. A Cornell University study estimated that honey bees annually pollinate $14 billion worth of seeds and crops in the United States. The honey bee population has been rapidly declining in recent years; wildlife pathologists have dubbed the phenomenon Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). In Colorado's fruit and vegetable industry, honey bees are responsible for $300 million in revenue. Despite the wonderful aspects of these fuzzy stinging insects, they can still be a nuisance and create hives that swarm and bother humans. Honey bees can build a fully functional hive overnight once they choose a location. Worker bees are responsible for honey production, an extremely nutrient-rich substance formed from worker bee saliva mixed with pollen.

Treating and Removing Carpenter Bees

Keeping exterior wood services sealed and painted is the best preventative measure to keep carpenter bees at bay. If carpenter bees already infiltrated your infrastructure, several treatment applications will be required. Each hole or entrance to their hive will need a covering of insecticidal dust capable of coating the tunnel's interior walls. Applications may need to be done numerous times within a 1 – 2 week period. Once each hole has been thoroughly treated with insecticidal dust, is it safe to fill them with a dowel rod coated in wood glue. After all the holes are filled, the entire wood surface should be painted or sealed to discourage future nesting. Insecticide sprays are available to apply to untreated wood surfaces, which help deter carpenter bees; however, this process must be repeated twice a year to be effective.

*Do not plug in carpenter bee holes before applying insecticide; they are skilled diggers, and this will only encourage them to dig out a new entry point.

Removing Bee Hives

Since bees are of great value to our ecosystem, Creature Control goes to extensive lengths to preserve these insects when at all possible. Due to honey bee hives' complex structure, extermination can be quite tricky and is not recommended for many reasons. Bees can repopulate old hives. If the hive is killed rather than properly removed, honeycomb left in the structure will attract mice, ants, raccoons, and other more problematic pests.

Creature Control works with local beekeepers who will extract the hive and move the intact nest to a safe location. The old site must be treated with an odor barrier that will discourage other colonies from forming hives nearby. Moreover, the entry point should be sealed so other bees cannot enter the structure in the future.

Bee Sting Treatment & Remedies

All stinging insects can trigger anaphylactic reactions in humans. This is an acute hypersensitivity brought on by the exposure to the venom in the bee's stinger. Since people can develop allergies over time, it is difficult to determine your risk, so if stung, monitor your condition carefully. Be prepared to seek medical attention if warranted. Signs of an allergic reaction include rashes on the skin, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, light-headedness, a swollen affected area, and sweating. If there are no signs of anaphylaxis, check to see whether the stinger remained in the site and remove it with a pair of tweezers if so. Wash with soap and water and cover the affected area with a cold substance such as an icepack wrapped in a towel. Ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or Benadryl can help to reduce pain and swelling. Calamine lotion usually helps to reduce itching when applied to the affected area. Also, smearing mud to the affected area will draw out venom from the skin if left on for 15 minutes.

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What do these animals sound like?
What's That Noise? What's that noise?
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Scratching during the day may indicate the presence of a bat, but this is uncommon.

More common sources of scratching or clawing during the day is a squirrel or a yellowjacket hive in the drywall, if it is summer.

A scratching sound coming from the attic is a good indication of the presence of a bat. The scratching may be constant or intermittent and may occur at day or night, though with a bat, this scratching will usually be heard at night. This is the sounds of the claws on the bat's wings as it moves around.

It may also indicate the presence of mice, however. An inspection is necessary to more directly pinpoint the source of the sound.

Gnawing sounds during the day are almost always due to the presence of a rodent, such a mouse, squirrel, chipmunk, or sometimes a rat. Rodents are characterized by their large incisor teeth, which continually grow and must be worn down by constant gnawing. Rodents will gnaw on wires, insulation and anything else they can find in an attic. Many house fires due to electrical problems are caused by damaged wires due to squirrel gnawing.

If you are hearing gnawing or chewing sounds at night, it may indicate the presence of a raccoon. Usually this will be accompanied by other noises, such as heavy walking. If you do not hear this, it may be a flying squirrel or some other rodent.

A "rolling" sound is usually due to the presence of a red squirrel bringing in nuts or other debris and rolling it around up in the attic, as squirrels will use attics to hoard food. If you hear this sound during the day, it is certainly a red squirrel, since red squirrels are the only mammals that commonly get into attics that are active during the day (flying squirrels get into attics as well but they are nocturnal). The "rolling" sound associated with a squirrel is sometimes described as the sound of marbles rolling.

If it is not a squirrel, there's a possibility a rolling sound could be made by birds moving around in a tight space.

Rolling sounds at night can be caused by flying squirrels, which are nocturnal. It is made by the squirrel bringing nuts or other debris into the attic or wall.

Raccoons may also make a rolling sound, though this is less common.

Scampering or scurrying during the day is almost always attributable to a squirrel, as most other scurrying animals (such as mice) are nocturnal.

A scurrying or scampering sound at night is usually due to mice moving through the walls, ceiling, or along the floor.

Nocturnal flying squirrels may make this noise as well; peak periods of activity for flying squirrels are just before dawn and shortly after sunset. Their scurrying is light and fast.

Raccoons may also make this sort of noise, but with a raccoon it will be more of a "walking" sound, a bit heavier than a squirrel, and not as fast.

Heavy walking or crawling is a very unique sound that almost always indicates the presence of a raccoon, whether it occurs during the day or night.

Heavy walking or crawling is a very unique sound that almost always indicates the presence of a raccoon, whether it occurs during the day or night.

If you can clearly hear the sound of flapping during the day, it is definitely a bird.

If you hear flapping at night, it is either a trapped bird or a bat. Nuisance birds are generally not active at night, so if you hear flapping it may be a bird that has become trapped. The flapping of a bat's wings is very soft, almost like a dull whirring. If you hear a very faint, soft whirring, it may mean a bat is flying around nearby in the dark.

Crackling is a very particular noise that is generally made by a yellowjacket hive within the drywall of your home. yellowjackets will pick and gnaw on drywall and use the pieces to construct their hives. The sound of this gnawing is often described as a crackling; it sounds a lot like Rice Krispies popping. If you hear this, it means the yellowjackets are close to gnawing through the dry wall. It is not as common at night, but certainly can happen then as well if the hive is big enough.

Crackling is a very particular noise that is generally made by the presence of a yellowjacket hive within the drywall of your home. yellowjackets will pick and gnaw on drywall and use the pieces to construct their hives. The sound of this gnawing is often described as a crackling; it sounds a lot like Rice Krispies popping. If you hear this, it means the yellowjackets are close to gnawing through the dry wall.

A sound of chirping or chattering usually means there are baby animals present. What species depends on the season, but it is very common for baby squirrels, raccoons, or birds (especially chimney swifts) to make these noises. Please contact Creature Control for a more thorough diagnosis.

A sound of chirping or chattering usually means there are baby animals present. What species depends on the season, but it is very common for baby squirrels, raccoons, or birds (especially chimney swifts) to make these noises. Please contact Creature Control for a more thorough diagnosis.

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