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Remediating
Boxelder Bug Swarms

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Controlling Swarming Boxelder Bugs

In the early spring or fall, boxelder bugs can alarm homeowners with their sudden swarms, seemingly overrunning a home or building. Most Coloradoans are familiar with the easily identifiable pest, with their black bodies and orange or red markings on their back and head. Boxelders eat the seeds of different species of maple trees; however, they especially prefer those from the box elder tree, from which they share their name. Typically, they nest on or very near a box elder or maple tree. Boxelder bugs swarm in large concentrations called “aggregations” for the purpose to sun themselves near their home.

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Boxelder Invaders

The first days of continued warmth bring out boxelder invaders who like to bask in the sun. They prefer locations that reflect the sun's rays, typically the siding of a home or business. Boxelder bugs become more of a nuisance when they infiltrate your home or office by crawling through cracks and cervices or underneath thresholds. While they lay dormant behind walls or siding or within trees to overwinter, they are well rested and out looking for food and water in the spring.

If caught indoors, boxelder bugs do not change their natural disposition to lay in the sun. They will attempt to sun themselves on windows and any other areas with sunlight, looking for a way outside. Unfortunately, most end up wandering around the building and dying with no way to exit. Boxelder bugs do not pose a threat to humans or plant life; however, large aggregations can be somewhat unsettling.

Boxelder Bug Removal with Creature Control Get Rid of Box Elder Bugs with Creature Control Creature Control is Your Box Elder Exterminator

Treating Boxelder Bugs

Creature Control's trained technicians will thoroughly assess your pest situation and develop a plan to remediate. One strategy we implement to decrease boxelder populations in or around your home is to treat the perimeter and surface areas. We also can apply interior spot treatments where needed. Remember, despite their large congregate numbers, boxelder bugs pose no danger to human health or property.

Removing or spraying boxelder trees near the premises is not a solution for boxelder bug management. Adult boxelder bugs are known to fly miles for food. Moreover, the benefits of boxelder trees outweigh occasional infestation issues. Boxelder bugs do not automatically return seasonally, despite large numbers being encountered in a given year.

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What's That Noise? What's that noise?
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Scratching during the day may indicate the presence of a bat, but this is uncommon.

More common sources of scratching or clawing during the day is a squirrel or a yellowjacket hive in the drywall, if it is summer.

A scratching sound coming from the attic is a good indication of the presence of a bat. The scratching may be constant or intermittent and may occur at day or night, though with a bat, this scratching will usually be heard at night. This is the sounds of the claws on the bat's wings as it moves around.

It may also indicate the presence of mice, however. An inspection is necessary to more directly pinpoint the source of the sound.

Gnawing sounds during the day are almost always due to the presence of a rodent, such a mouse, squirrel, chipmunk, or sometimes a rat. Rodents are characterized by their large incisor teeth, which continually grow and must be worn down by constant gnawing. Rodents will gnaw on wires, insulation and anything else they can find in an attic. Many house fires due to electrical problems are caused by damaged wires due to squirrel gnawing.

If you are hearing gnawing or chewing sounds at night, it may indicate the presence of a raccoon. Usually this will be accompanied by other noises, such as heavy walking. If you do not hear this, it may be a flying squirrel or some other rodent.

A "rolling" sound is usually due to the presence of a red squirrel bringing in nuts or other debris and rolling it around up in the attic, as squirrels will use attics to hoard food. If you hear this sound during the day, it is certainly a red squirrel, since red squirrels are the only mammals that commonly get into attics that are active during the day (flying squirrels get into attics as well but they are nocturnal). The "rolling" sound associated with a squirrel is sometimes described as the sound of marbles rolling.

If it is not a squirrel, there's a possibility a rolling sound could be made by birds moving around in a tight space.

Rolling sounds at night can be caused by flying squirrels, which are nocturnal. It is made by the squirrel bringing nuts or other debris into the attic or wall.

Raccoons may also make a rolling sound, though this is less common.

Scampering or scurrying during the day is almost always attributable to a squirrel, as most other scurrying animals (such as mice) are nocturnal.

A scurrying or scampering sound at night is usually due to mice moving through the walls, ceiling, or along the floor.

Nocturnal flying squirrels may make this noise as well; peak periods of activity for flying squirrels are just before dawn and shortly after sunset. Their scurrying is light and fast.

Raccoons may also make this sort of noise, but with a raccoon it will be more of a "walking" sound, a bit heavier than a squirrel, and not as fast.

Heavy walking or crawling is a very unique sound that almost always indicates the presence of a raccoon, whether it occurs during the day or night.

Heavy walking or crawling is a very unique sound that almost always indicates the presence of a raccoon, whether it occurs during the day or night.

If you can clearly hear the sound of flapping during the day, it is definitely a bird.

If you hear flapping at night, it is either a trapped bird or a bat. Nuisance birds are generally not active at night, so if you hear flapping it may be a bird that has become trapped. The flapping of a bat's wings is very soft, almost like a dull whirring. If you hear a very faint, soft whirring, it may mean a bat is flying around nearby in the dark.

Crackling is a very particular noise that is generally made by a yellowjacket hive within the drywall of your home. yellowjackets will pick and gnaw on drywall and use the pieces to construct their hives. The sound of this gnawing is often described as a crackling; it sounds a lot like Rice Krispies popping. If you hear this, it means the yellowjackets are close to gnawing through the dry wall. It is not as common at night, but certainly can happen then as well if the hive is big enough.

Crackling is a very particular noise that is generally made by the presence of a yellowjacket hive within the drywall of your home. yellowjackets will pick and gnaw on drywall and use the pieces to construct their hives. The sound of this gnawing is often described as a crackling; it sounds a lot like Rice Krispies popping. If you hear this, it means the yellowjackets are close to gnawing through the dry wall.

A sound of chirping or chattering usually means there are baby animals present. What species depends on the season, but it is very common for baby squirrels, raccoons, or birds (especially chimney swifts) to make these noises. Please contact Creature Control for a more thorough diagnosis.

A sound of chirping or chattering usually means there are baby animals present. What species depends on the season, but it is very common for baby squirrels, raccoons, or birds (especially chimney swifts) to make these noises. Please contact Creature Control for a more thorough diagnosis.

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