Use Common Scents with These Pests

Memorable and rightly feared for that particular, pungent odor (which humans can detect 3.5 miles downwind!), skunks are recognizable by their black and white fur. Some boast, instead, a brown or gray or cream-colored coat, but all are similar enough to curl the end of your hair if you meet one unexpectedly on an evening stroll. Their omnivorous diet of insects and some lesser pests may make them valuable to your area. Unfortunately, the skunk is one of four wild animals known to be a primary carrier of the rabies virus (others being: bats, raccoons, and foxes), so a sizeable distance is desired. While that infamous scent can stick to a person, clothing, a dog, or a car, the silver lining is that a skunk utilizes it only when they —or their kits, as the babies are called— are threatened. This means that as soon as you spot one of…

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Why You Suck at Insect Control

Most people know that there are some pests that they just can’t control by themselves, such as mosquitos or bedbugs. Mosquitoes don’t necessarily breed on your property, and the only good way to control them is with a fog treatment. On the opposite end of control, bedbugs are off-putting and resistant enough to over-the-counter remedies that most people end up calling a professional right away (which is the right decision).  But what about insects that many people try and treat without a second thought, such as wasps, ants, or stinkbugs?  Every grocery store carries a line of insecticides, or even traps, all claiming to “kill on contact,” or “kills *given pest* instantly,” but when used by the average consumer, they often do little to nothing to stem the tide of insects. What is the difference between generally available products and those that our technicians use to control pest issues? The…

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Evicting Long-Term Guests

There’s a good chance that at some point during the winter, you’ve experienced an infestation of insects. This can be unexpected; after all, bugs should be dead from the freezing temperatures here in Colorado. The fact is, our homes are often where colonies of insects overwinter to survive the cold, harsh elements. Typically, insects will overwinter as adults, entering homes through tiny cracks, crevices, ductwork, or vents. They’ll often end up in groups or clusters in wall voids or attic spaces near heat and ventilation sources, usually remaining there until spring. Sometimes, though, any increase in temperature may fool the insects into movement. Thus, you may find them in the living spaces of your home. Common finds are stinkbugs, boxelder bugs, Asian Lady beetles, and cluster flies. Oddly enough, the insects rarely use this time to reproduce; instead, they stay relatively stagnant unless they wake up. Since standard contact-based pesticides…

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Histoplasmosis & Bat Guano

When considering the potential dangers of bats, most people will know about the possibility that the flying rodents carry rabies, which is undoubtedly a valid concern. There’s no reason to downplay that risk because it’s certainly real, but a far more likely issue (statistically speaking) is contracting Histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis is a disease that generally affects the lungs and can be contracted through exposure to bat feces, commonly known as guano. Large amounts of guano left to dry are usually a result of a successful bat eviction that did not involve any cleanup or a failed cleanup. Exposure usually comes from disturbing guano that has dried out, as the disease comes from fungal spores that infect the bats themselves and are present in the guano. Symptoms of Histoplasmosis include aches, chest tightness, fevers, chills, and in chronic cases, bloody coughs. It is treatable, but if left to spread outside the lungs,…

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Effective Mouse Control

As winter approaches and the temperature outside drops, we humans like to cozy up inside our nice, warm houses. Unfortunately, so do pests such as mice, squirrels, and raccoons. In Colorado, mice are certainly our biggest wintertime pest concern. Unlike other mammals, a mouse will not hibernate, and mice colonies will remain active throughout the winter season. In fact, mouse activity may even increase during the colder weather because those living nearby, in fields, etc., will be drawn inside your home as they seek warm shelter. Mice have an incredible sense of smell, and they are small enough to squeeze through a hole the size of a dime. They are nocturnal and are generally not seen during the day. A sure sign of a rodent infestation is mouse droppings, dirty/grease smudges along baseboards, a distinctive ammonia-like odor (strong urine smell), damage caused by their constant gnawing, nests made from shredded…

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Understanding Recurring Services

Many of our customers call us out to deal with raccoons, bats, or squirrels: issues that are usually solved within a few weeks (depending on the season) and with only a few visits from one of our technicians.  Pest issues, however (especially mice), nearly always require more maintenance to keep control over the population.  This can seem discouraging to those who just want their problem solved, but we have a nearly painless method of maintaining control over small rodents.  Therefore, we often recommend our Recurring Services program. Typically, a mouse service starts with an initial inspection. The technician will write up an estimate for a rodenticide application, determine the number of exterior and garage bait stations (containing rodenticide) required, and the seal work to be done.  The rodenticide treatment and the bait stations can usually be done at the same visit, and two weeks later, the technician will return to…

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How Do Mice Get in the Attic?

A common pest control problem we often run into is mice in the attic. But how do mice get up into the attic to begin with? While we tend to imagine mice scurrying around on the ground, they are also excellent climbers. They can climb up to 13 inches on a smooth surface. On rougher surfaces that provide better footholds (like brick or wood) they can go up and down with ease. If you have mice in your attic, chances are they are climbing up the outside of the house somewhere and going in at the roofline. Since part of an effective mouse treatment is sealing the home against reentry, Creature Control’s technicians always try to identify how mice are getting in to begin with. One of our technicians recently went to a home with a severe mouse problem in the attic. Upon inspecting the outside of the house, he noticed several locations…

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