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Poisonous Snake Removal

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Trapping and Removing Snakes

Snakes are terrifying to most people; however, they are actually beneficial predators to have in the ecosystem because they feed on mice and other small nuisance mammals. The vast majority of snakes are not venomous, but in Colorado and Wyoming, we have three major ones: the Prairie Rattlesnake, the Western Massasauga Rattlesnake, and the Midget Faded Rattlesnake. If you come across a nuisance or poisonous snake in your home or property, give the professionals at Creature Control a call for safe removal.

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Snake Biology and Characteristics

Snakes are generally not aggressive; they tend to keep to themselves, either sunning themselves, or laying in the cool shadows to regulate their body temperature. They only hiss, slither, or rattle as a scare tactic to avoid confrontation as they would rather slide away without having to strike. Snakes, like most predators, prefer to save their energy to track prey. They use their forked tongue, which enables them to smell odor particles in the air. Their skeletal system makes them versatile, light, and flexible. A pliable ligament connects the jaw and skull, allowing them to open their mouths wide enough to swallow prey much larger than themselves.

Most snakes lay eggs, and they prefer to do so in damp, isolated locations. These eggs will hatch within approximately two months. Some other snakes give live birth; they lay and hatch their young within their bodies. All snakes abandoned their eggs or young after they are laid, as infant reptiles can fully look after themselves. Snakes shed their skin (called ecdysis) as all reptiles do. Shedding is a natural process of growth and regeneration. Snakeskin has a limited capacity for growth, so when a snake's body expands and grows, it will shed its outer layer and regrow anew.

All snakes in the Colorado/Wyoming area have teeth and are potential carriers of salmonella. Anytime you are bitten by a snake – even non-poisonous – keep in mind the chance of infection could be imminent. Antidotes made from snake venom are given to those who have been bitten by poisonous snakes. Their venom is also used to formulate treatments for cancer, heart disease, Parkinson’s, and other diseases.

Hunting of Snakes in Colorado and Wyoming

There are 31 different snake species in Colorado and Wyoming, three rattlesnakes are venomous: Prairie, Western Massasauga, and Midget Faded. Always check with your state’s wildlife commission or department of natural resources for up-to-date, specific information regarding the regulations for hunting this species. In Colorado, the Prairie Rattlesnake season runs from June 15 through August 15, with daily bag and possession limits in effect. The Midget and Massasauga rattlers are on the state’s “special concern” list. Colorado State Statutes also specify, “Any person may kill rattlesnakes when necessary to protect life or property” [33-6-107(9), C.R.S.].

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Domesticated Exotic Snakes

Pet snakes have been known to escape (or be purposefully released) into the wild in recent years. This growing problem creates more danger for the public, as these snakes are usually much bigger than indigenous snakes, therefore much more of a threat. Boa Constrictors and Pythons – two of the most popular pet snakes – can be deadly and should be handled professionally. They can murder domestic animals and occasionally even their owners. Handling exotic snakes without experience or proper training could lead to severe injury or death. Despite being illegal to own venomous snakes without a valid license, many owners will release their snakes into the wild for various reasons. This is detrimental to the snake and poses dangers to the surrounding ecosystem and community as well.

Safely Removing Snakes

Whether it’s a native snake that’s found its way into your home or property or a pet on the loose, Creature Control can safely handle their removal. Snakes might be difficult to identify, so play it safe and stay away. If one breached your home or business, it’s best to call a professional for safe removal. The presence of snake holes is a sure sign that a den is nearby; you should be on alert as they never travel far from it. Like other wildlife pests, snakes can enter your premises through open entry points. Modify your environment as needed and ensure to pinpoint and seal any access areas.

Per federal and state laws, most reptiles are protected; thus, removing snakes manually may be the only/best option to solve a pest problem. Creature Control’s expert technicians can locate points of entry and seal them up properly to prevent reentry. If you have a snake in your home or business, don’t hesitate, call the professionals at Creature Control today.

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What's That Noise? What's that noise?
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Scratching during the day may indicate the presence of a bat, but this is uncommon.

More common sources of scratching or clawing during the day is a squirrel or a yellowjacket hive in the drywall, if it is summer.

A scratching sound coming from the attic is a good indication of the presence of a bat. The scratching may be constant or intermittent and may occur at day or night, though with a bat, this scratching will usually be heard at night. This is the sounds of the claws on the bat's wings as it moves around.

It may also indicate the presence of mice, however. An inspection is necessary to more directly pinpoint the source of the sound.

Gnawing sounds during the day are almost always due to the presence of a rodent, such a mouse, squirrel, chipmunk, or sometimes a rat. Rodents are characterized by their large incisor teeth, which continually grow and must be worn down by constant gnawing. Rodents will gnaw on wires, insulation and anything else they can find in an attic. Many house fires due to electrical problems are caused by damaged wires due to squirrel gnawing.

If you are hearing gnawing or chewing sounds at night, it may indicate the presence of a raccoon. Usually this will be accompanied by other noises, such as heavy walking. If you do not hear this, it may be a flying squirrel or some other rodent.

A "rolling" sound is usually due to the presence of a red squirrel bringing in nuts or other debris and rolling it around up in the attic, as squirrels will use attics to hoard food. If you hear this sound during the day, it is certainly a red squirrel, since red squirrels are the only mammals that commonly get into attics that are active during the day (flying squirrels get into attics as well but they are nocturnal). The "rolling" sound associated with a squirrel is sometimes described as the sound of marbles rolling.

If it is not a squirrel, there's a possibility a rolling sound could be made by birds moving around in a tight space.

Rolling sounds at night can be caused by flying squirrels, which are nocturnal. It is made by the squirrel bringing nuts or other debris into the attic or wall.

Raccoons may also make a rolling sound, though this is less common.

Scampering or scurrying during the day is almost always attributable to a squirrel, as most other scurrying animals (such as mice) are nocturnal.

A scurrying or scampering sound at night is usually due to mice moving through the walls, ceiling, or along the floor.

Nocturnal flying squirrels may make this noise as well; peak periods of activity for flying squirrels are just before dawn and shortly after sunset. Their scurrying is light and fast.

Raccoons may also make this sort of noise, but with a raccoon it will be more of a "walking" sound, a bit heavier than a squirrel, and not as fast.

Heavy walking or crawling is a very unique sound that almost always indicates the presence of a raccoon, whether it occurs during the day or night.

Heavy walking or crawling is a very unique sound that almost always indicates the presence of a raccoon, whether it occurs during the day or night.

If you can clearly hear the sound of flapping during the day, it is definitely a bird.

If you hear flapping at night, it is either a trapped bird or a bat. Nuisance birds are generally not active at night, so if you hear flapping it may be a bird that has become trapped. The flapping of a bat's wings is very soft, almost like a dull whirring. If you hear a very faint, soft whirring, it may mean a bat is flying around nearby in the dark.

Crackling is a very particular noise that is generally made by a yellowjacket hive within the drywall of your home. yellowjackets will pick and gnaw on drywall and use the pieces to construct their hives. The sound of this gnawing is often described as a crackling; it sounds a lot like Rice Krispies popping. If you hear this, it means the yellowjackets are close to gnawing through the dry wall. It is not as common at night, but certainly can happen then as well if the hive is big enough.

Crackling is a very particular noise that is generally made by the presence of a yellowjacket hive within the drywall of your home. yellowjackets will pick and gnaw on drywall and use the pieces to construct their hives. The sound of this gnawing is often described as a crackling; it sounds a lot like Rice Krispies popping. If you hear this, it means the yellowjackets are close to gnawing through the dry wall.

A sound of chirping or chattering usually means there are baby animals present. What species depends on the season, but it is very common for baby squirrels, raccoons, or birds (especially chimney swifts) to make these noises. Please contact Creature Control for a more thorough diagnosis.

A sound of chirping or chattering usually means there are baby animals present. What species depends on the season, but it is very common for baby squirrels, raccoons, or birds (especially chimney swifts) to make these noises. Please contact Creature Control for a more thorough diagnosis.

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